2014-2015 Events

2014-2015 DISCO and DISCO Affiliate Events

September | October | November | December | January | February | March | April | May

September 2014

September 9, 11-12:30 pm
Estelle B. Freedman Public Lecture, "Redefining Rape: Sexual Violence in the Era of Suffrage and Segregation"
The Round Meeting Room, Ohio Union 3rd Floor
Sponsored by Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Sexual Studies, and The History Department Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Series

September 9, 4-5:30 pm
John D'Emilio Public Lecture, "Rethinking Queer History, or: Richard Nixon, Gay Liberationist?"
Lazenby Hall 21
Sponsored by Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Sexual Studies, and The History Department Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies Workshop Series

September 11, 3:30 pm
Honoring Civil Rights Struggles: A DISCO Welcome Reception
Campus Reading Room (1120 Thompson)

September 12-13, all day 
Symposium, "Black Girls: The Silent Crisis"
AAAS Community Extension Center 905 Mt. Vernon Ave. Columbus, OH
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department

September 16, 7 pm
"An Evening With Laverne Cox"

OSU Fawcett Center

September 17, 11:30-1:30 pm
"Pretty/Funny Brown Bag Book Discussion with Linda Mizejewski"
386B Univesrity Hall

September 19, 1:30-3 pm 
Brown Bag Lecture, "Gun Violence as a Public Health Issue," Kwame Christian, Kirwan Institute
386 University Hall
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department

September 23, 5:30 pm
"Embracing An All-And Identity in an Either/Or World," Dr. Robyn Ochs
Student Life Multicultural Center

September 24, 8 pm
"Beyond Binaries: Identity and Sexuality," Dr. Robyn Ochs
Student Life Multicultural Center

September 29, 4:30 pm 
Ellen Feder Public Lecture, "Normalizing Atypical Sex Anatomies: A Question of Ethics or Culture?"
100 Mendenhall Lab

September 29, 4:30-6 pm
"Whistling as Women's Work" A Musicology Lecture by Maribeth Clark, New College of Florida
18th Avenue Library, Room 205

September 30, 10-12 pm
Ellen Feder Faculty and Graduate Student Workshop
3
11 Denney Hall

October 2014

October 14, 12 pm
Dr. Treva Lindsay Lecture: "Pop Feminism?: An Exploration of Emergent Feminist Standpoints in U.S. Popular Culture"
311 Denney Hall

October 14, 1:30-3 pm
AAAS Distinguished Lecture, Fall 2014, "Diasporic Dissidents: African American Hebrews and the Redefinition of All Things Black," Dean John L. Jackson, University of Pennsylvania
Location: TBA
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department

October 14, 6:45-9 pm
Film and Discussion w/ Producer John L. Jackson, Bad Friday: Rastafari After Coral Gardens
Location: TBA
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department

October 14, 4-6 pm
Hispanic Heritage Month Keynote Speaker: Ilan Stavans

Saxbe Auditorium, Drinko Hall

October 14, 6 pm
Ford Foundation Fellowship Foundation Workshop: Demystifying the Application Proccess, A Panel Discussion and Workshop
Hagerty 455
Sponsored by Latina/o Studies

October 14, 2014, 7-9 pm
Hillel, Ohio State Wexner Jewish Student Center
 

October 16, 4:30-6 pm
"The Good Citizen," Professor Catherine Ramírez. Professor at University of California, Santa Cruz. Author of The Woman in the Zoot Suit: Gender, Nationalism and the Cultural Politics of Memory
Multicultural Center

This paper studies the relationship between assimilation and citizenship in the United States, with a focus on the ways in which undocumented immigrants are redefining the latter in the early twenty-first century.  Despite lacking formal citizenship, self-proclaimed shadow and undocumented Americans have claimed Americanness.  In the words of José Antonio Vargas, founder of the immigrant advocacy project Define American, “I’m an American.  I just don’t have the right papers.”  Undocumented immigrants like Vargas pass as Americans, thereby unhinging Americanness from formal belonging and offering a broader and more inclusive vision of the United States.  This is a bold and subversive move, yet how is Americanness enacted in the absence of formal citizenship and, by the same token, what are the signs of non-Americanness or undocumentedness?  To address these questions, I study recent autobiographical works by undocumented immigrants as both immigrant and passing narratives, highlighting the ways in which some rely on and reinforce older notions of assimilation, race, and civic deservingness, while others reconceive of citizenship and belonging.

October 19, all day
Location TBD
Co-sponsored by: OSU Asian American Studies, Sexuality Studies, and the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
 
October 20, 1-3 pm
Commemorating the 1965 Immigration Act: Reflections on Its Legacy Today
Frank W. Hale Jr Black Cultural Center, MLK Room
Co-sponsored by Latina/o Studies.
This event is part of ‘50 Years Later,’ a series that marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act. The series examines the historical context and current legacies of this act. Particularly, it highlights the varied and contradictory meanings of this bill for different migrant populations. A lecture will be followed by a reception and book signing.
 
Juan González is a journalist, co-host of the independent news program Democracy Now!, and author of Harvest of Empire: A History of Latinos in America and News for All the People: The Epic Story of Race and the American Media.
 
October 21, 6-7:30 pm
Mia Nakano's The Visibility Project: Artist's Lecture/Photo Exhibit
Alonso Family Room - Multicultural Center at The Ohio State University
Co-sponsored by: OSU Asian American Studies, Sexuality Studies, and the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
 
October 24, 1:30-3 pm
Brown Bag Lecture, "An Analysis of Traditional Religious Values of Ndebele People of Zimbabwe within the contexts of Colonial and Postcolonial Legacies ," Elliot Masomera (PhD Candidate), University of South Africa 
386 University Hall
 
October 26, 6:30 pm
Drexel Theater in Bexley, OH
Co-sponsored by Columbus Urban Pride and DISCO
Join Columbus Urban Pride and DISCO for a screening of “Out in the Night.” This film tells the story of four African American women in New York City who became unfairly classified as a “Gang of Killer Lesbians” when, fearing for their lives, defended themselves against a violent attack of a male aggressor.  The screening of this film begins a series of community-based dialogues about the violence often faced by LGBTQ communities of color.
 
A reception for the film will begin at 6:30pm and the film will be screened at 7:30pm.
 
October 27, 3:30-5 pm
"The Right Kind of Difference: Latino Republicans and the Pleasures of Race," Dr. Cristina Beltrán. Professor at New York University. Author of The Trouble with Unity: Latino Politics and the Creation of Identity. Co-sponsored with Migration and Global Justice Workshop Series
Mershon Center for International Security Studies 1501 Neil Ave.
Situated at the intersection of Latino politics and political theory, this talk will explore the paradoxical nature of Latino conservatism and right-wing Latinidad. Arguing that conservative thought within Latino communities is shaped not only by ideology but through a potent combination of emotion and expression, this talk shows how conservative Latino elites seek to engage Latino voters' aesthetic and affective sensibilities. Exploring how Latino political elites are currently articulating conservative theories of visibility, agency, and action, I argue that the Right's effort to aestheticize action highlights the importance of judgment when trying to understand the meaning of an enhanced Latino presence in the GOP.
 
October 27, 5:30-7:00 pm
Hagerty Hall 0062
Sponsored by The Latina/o Studies Program, MAPS: Minority Association of Pre-Medical Students, College of Medicine Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and the Latino Medical Student Association at OSU

 
October 30, 2:30-4 pm
Día de los muertos I: “Fashioning Decolonial Optics:  Days of the Dead 'Walking Altars' and 'Calavera Fashion Shows' in Chicana/o-Latina/o L.A.,” Dr. Laura Perez. Professor of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley. Author of Chicana Art: The Politics of Spiritual and Aesthetic Altarities
Multicultural Center
 
October 30, 4:30-6 pm
Multicultural Center 
 

November 2014

Co-sponsored by the Disability Studies Program, DISCO, the Melton Center for Jewish Studies, the Multicultural Center, Literacy Studies, and the Center for Folklore Studies.
 
November 3, 4 pm
MCC Meeting Room
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
November 4, 7:30 pm
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
Cartoon Room, Ohio Union 
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
November 5, 4-6 pm
OSU Humanities Institute, George Wells Knight House, 104 East 15th Ave
Co-sponsored by the Department of English; The Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and the Asian American Studies Program
 
November 6, 12-2 pm
Alonso Family Room, OSU Multicultural Center, Ohio Union
Sponsored by OSU Asian American Studies, the Humanities Institute, Department of English, and Film Studies.
 
November 6, 4:30-6pm
DuBois’ Afro-Futurism and Vasconcelos’ Indología,” Dr. Juliet Hooker. Professor of Government and African and African Diaspora Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity Talk on Race in Latin and Latino America.
Multicultural Center
The ideas about race formulated by the Mexican philosopher José Vasconcelos [1882-1959] and the African American thinker W. E. B. DuBois [1868-1963] are often said to be exemplary of the distinct and opposed approaches to racial identity and racial mixing characteristic of U.S. African-American and Latin American and political thought. In this talk I focus on two rarely discussed texts by these thinkers: DuBois’ only novel, Dark Princess (1928), an interracial romance that imagines a political alliance of people of color worldwide, and Vasconcelos’ Indologia (1927), in which his arguments about Latin American identity (later synthesized in The Cosmic Race) were initially developed. I compare the anti-colonial impulses that animate both texts, and consider the insights gleaned by reading DuBois’ text through the lens of Afro-futurism, especially in relation to Latin American Indigenismo.  
 
November 6, 7 pm
Screening of Freida Lee Mock's ANITA: Speaking Truth to Power
Wexner Center's Mershon Auditorium
Sponsored by the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
 
November 7, 11 am
Anita Hill Panel Discussion: "Responding to Gendered Violence on College Campuses"
Saxbe Auditorium at the Mortiz College of Law
Sponsored by the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
November 10, 5:30 pm
MCC Cartoon Room 2
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
November 12, 7:30 pm
Maudine Cow Room
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
November 13, 4:30-6 pm  
 “Virtually Latino/a: A Poetics,” Dr. Tomás Urayoán Noel. Professor at New York University.  Author of In Visible Movement: Nuyorican Poetry from the Sixties to Slam. 
Multicultural Center
This hybrid talk/performance proposes a “virtual” approach to Latino/a identity attuned to the problematics of perception and transmission. Building on virtuality theorists such as N. Katherine Hayles and Brian Massumi, this presentation outlines an alternative genealogy of Latino/a art and politics in an effort to bridge the social-movements of the 1960s and 1970s and the social-media present. Echoing Massumi's characterization of virtuality as a “movement in perception,” the presentation maps an experimental political imagination, from the Royal Chicano Air Force in the 1960s to the El Puerto Rican Embassy website in the 1990s and beyond. The last part of the presentation consists of a reading of original poetry, much of it composed and/or performed with the aid of a smartphone, and informed by the virtuality poetics discussed in the first part. The hybrid format of this presentation is partly an attempt to embody these problematics of perception and transmission, and to consider these playful poetics of institutional critique in all their messiness and complexity. 
 
November 14
Brown Bag Lecture, "Hegel and Exceptionalism," Pedro Periera, Portuguese & Iberian Studies
386 University Hall
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department
 
November 17, 4 pm
168 Dulles Hall
Sponsored by Latina/o Studies
 
November 17, 5:30 pm
Instructional Kitchen, Ohio Union
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program
 
November 19, 5:00 pm
Archie M. Griffin West Ballroom
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program. RSVP required.
 
November 20, 4:30-6 pm
Latinas Made to Serve?  Feeling Brown, Glam …and a Maid,” Dr. Ana Lopez. Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Director of the Cuban and Caribbean Studies Institute at Tulane University. Author of Hollywood, Nuestra América y los Latinos.
Multicultral Center
This talk will explore how recent films and television series have glamourized and simultaneously complicated the representation of Latina domestic service.  Arguing that we need to unpack and trouble the complex relationships among agency, representation and melodrama condensed in the figure of the contemporary Latina maid, my talk will focus primarily on the Lifetime series Devious Maids (Seasons 1 & 2, 2013 - 2014) but will also reference the earlier films Spanglish (James L. Brooks, 2004) and Maid in Manhattan (Wayne Wang, 2002) and other recent TV series.   
 
Jennings Hall 155
Sponsored by the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
 
November 21, 5 pm
MCC Meeting Room
Sponsored by the American Indian Studies Program

December 2014

December 3, 5:30 pm
180 Hagerty Hall
Professor Doniger (University of Chicago) is one of the world's experts on Hinduism, mythology, and comparative religions, with a strong focus on women, gender, and sexuality. She is the author of over 40 books, including most recently The Hindus: An Alternative History. Co-sponsored by Sexuality Studies.

January 2015

January 21, TBA
GradPAC Resume Whorkshop 
GradPAC is planning a resume workshop for graduate and undergraduate students. Come learn how to set up a cv/resume, how to frame yourself using specific words and phrases, and talk to people about their graduate school experiences!
 
Mershon Center for Security Studies
Sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS)
 
Multicultural Center, Alonso Family Room
 
January 29, TBA
“State of the Field: Asian Pacific American Studies” Roundtable
Organized by GradPAC
 
January 29, 4:00-6:00 pm
035 Hitchcock Hall
Jennifer Nash's work focuses on black feminism, black sexual politics, race and visual culture, and race and law. She is an Assistant Professor of American Studies in American Studies at George Washington University. Nash's last publication The Black Body in Ecstasy will be one of four of 2014 NWSA's Authors Meet Critics sessions. Nash rewrites black feminism's theory of representation. Her analysis moves beyond black feminism's preoccupation with injury and recovery to consider how racial fictions can create a space of agency and even pleasure for black female subjects. Nash's innovative readings of hardcore pornographic films from the 1970s and 1980s develop a new method of analyzing racialized pornography that focuses on black women's pleasures in blackness: delights in toying with and subverting blackness, moments of racialized excitement, deliberate enactments of hyperbolic blackness, and humorous performances of blackness that poke fun at the fantastical project of race. Drawing on feminist and queer theory, critical race theory, and media studies, Nash creates a new black feminist interpretative practice, one attentive to the messy contradictions—between delight and discomfort, between desire and degradation—at the heart of black pleasures. *Co-sponsored by the OSU Sexuality Studies Program*
 
January 28, 6 pm
Multicultural Center, Alonso Family Room
Sponsored by Latino Students Association, OSU
 
January 30, 10:00-12:00 pm
TBA
 *Co-sponsored by the OSU Sexuality Studies Program*
 

February 2015


February 7, all day
TBA
Sponsors: College of Medicine Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Student National Medical Association and Latina/o Medical Student Association. For information contact: Ms. Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, valerie.blackwell-truitt@osumc.edu
 
February 12, 4-5 pm
Room 110B, Hale Black Cultural Center
Sponsored by Latina/o Studies and the Department of Political Science
 
February 27, 1:30-3:00 pm
Distinguished Lecture by Mary Helen Washington, University of Maryland
Location TBA
Sponsored by the African American and African Studies Department
 

March 2015

March 3, all day
Hale Hall Black Cultural Center, MLK Lounge Room 132
Cathy Cohen's general field of specialization is American politics, although her research interests include African-American politics, women and politics, lesbian and gay politics, and social movements.
 
She is the author of the book The Boundaries of Blackness: AIDS and the Breakdown of Black Politics (University Of Chicago Press, 1999), the co-editor with Kathleen Jones and Joan Tronto of Women Transforming Politics: An Alternative Reader (New York University Press, 1997) and her newest text is Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics (Oxford University Press, 2010). Cohen also is editor with Frederick Harris of a new book series from Oxford Press entitled Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities.*Co-sponsored by the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; African American and African Studies, the OSU Sexuality Studies Program, and others. 
 
March 3, 4-5 pm, Multicultural Center, Alonso Family Room
Sponsored by the Latina/o Studies Program
 
March 4, 4:00 pm, Pomerene 214
Professor Bert Winther-Tamaki (Chair of Art History, UC-Irvine) will lead a manuscript workshop for Namiko Kunimoto (Assistant Professor, History of Art) on her book-in-progress, Anxious Bodies: Gender and Nation in Postwar Japanese ArtWinther-Tamaki’s visit is co-sponsored by Asian American Studies, History of Art, Japanese Studies, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.
 
March 5, 4:00 pm, Traditions Room of the Ohio Union
Winther-Tamaki’s visit is co-sponsored by Asian American Studies, History of Art, Japanese Studies, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.
 
March 12, 7:00 pm, US Bank Conference Theater, Ohio Union
The Student Life Multicultural Center, in partnership with the Office of Diversity & Inclusion, Stonewall Columbus, Equality Ohio, Kaleidoscope Youth Center, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies and Sexuality Studies, is pleased to invite you to attend a screening of the acclaimed documentary film, "Kate Bornstein is a Queer & Pleasant Danger," followed by a post-screening discussion with Kate Bornstein and film director Sam Feder.
 
March 23, 8:30 am-7:30 pm, Mershon Center for International Security, 1501 Neil Ave. Columbus, OH
 
March 23, 5:00 pm, Wexner Center for the Arts
This event is sponsored by the Latina/o Studies Program, the Department of English, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the Wexner Center for the Arts, the Department of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, the College of Education and Human Ecology - Teaching and Learning, and EHE Office of Diversity and Inclusion.
Reception will begin at 5pm. The film will start at 5:30pm with a talk-back with the filmmakers immediately following. For more information, please contact Professor Koritha Mitchell at mitchell.717@osu.edu.
 
March 30, 12 pm, Saxbe Auditorium in the Moritz College of Law
A Roundtable Featuring Michelle Alexander (Ohio State University), César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández (Capital University & University of Denver), and Silky Shah (Detention Watch Network). Sponsored by Asian American Studies, College of Social Work, Comparative Studies, Criminal Justice Research Center, Department of Political Science, Latina/o Studies, Mershon Workshop on Immigration & Global Justice, Multicultural Center, Office of Diversity and Inclusion, and Student Bar Association. 
 

April

April 2, 4:30 pm, Room 1000 Multicultural Center, Ohio Union
Sex Trafficking, Narrative, and the Moral Economies of Human Rights
Sponsored by the Department of English and the Multicultural Center
Julietta Hua (University of California, San Diego) is Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies. She teaches courses on U.S. citizenship and politics, immigration, law and human rights. She is author of Trafficking Women’s Human Rights (Minnesota 2011). In addition to her research interest in sex trafficking and human rights, she publishes on U.S. gender asylum cases and chimpanzee sanctuaries, carework and the post-racial.
 
April 6, 12-2 pm, Hagerty Hall 042
A DISCO Workshop for Emerging Research
 
April 8, 4-5 pm, Cockins Hall, Room 232​
Sponsored by the Latina/o Studies Program
 
April 9, 5-7 pm, 158 Buttles Ave, Columbus, OH
Barbara and Si Sokol Essay Scholarship Fundraiser
 
April 10-11, location to be determined
HipHop Literacies Conference, "HipHop Studies Future"
 
April 15, 2-4 pm, 311 Denney Hall
Sponsored by Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
 
April 15, 4 pm, Multicultural Center
 
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